One-Upping Zuckerberg: 10 Women Who Manage Startups and School (And Don’t Drop Out)

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Ah, college life: decorating your dorm room, signing up for new classes, launching your first company.

Wait, what?

It’s no longer headline news for college students to handle classes and break through with a revolutionary new business; it’s where Mark Zuckerburg started Facebook, John Dorsey and his friends came up with Twitter and Shawn Fanning dreamed up Napster.

Unlike those three innovators, the latest round of successful student entrepreneurs aren’t dropping out… and they’re ladies.

Here are ten great businesses started by women who balanced university demands with the challenges of running a start-up.

KAT VOROTOVA : TRY THE WORLD

“Discover the World Through Food!” is the slogan for Columbia University students Kat Vorotova and classmate David Foult’s gourmet food subscription company, in which members receive shipments of exotic foods from around the world with exotic foods. These two students already anticipate $400,000 in revenue in its first year—all without spending a dime on marketing.

kat-vorotova-entrepreneur-founder-try-the-world-boxtry the world food box


MEGAN COX: AMALIE BEAUTY // 
WINK NATURAL COSMETICS

This wink is no joke. In 2013, Massachusetts Institute of Technology student Megan Cox teamed up with fellow student Miguel Salinas to start a cosmetics company that was not only all-natural but based on “real science.” The team has now expanded into a line of “farm to face” beauty products and a twice-weekly blog.

wink-cosmetics

 

EMILY LAGASSE: FEDWELL

Every dog owner knows how devastating it can be when our furry friends get sick. When this happened to Emily Lagasse, she did more than standing by and hoping for the best. Instead, she created a nutrient-rich, byproduct-free dog food for her ill pup while she attending Babson College.

fedwell

 

CAROLYN YARINA: CENTRICYCLE

Chock it up as another thing we take for granted: when a medical emergency strikes, most of us can easily find a nearby hospital. But for many residents of rural India, traveling to the closest doctor can take weeks. To help remedy the problem, University of Michigan student Carolyn Yarina created an organization that develops medical products and tools, helping to bring health services to areas without major medical infrastructure.

 

GABRIELLE PALERMO: G3BOX

Also concerned with the plight of people unable to access quality health care, Arizona State University student Gabrielle Palermo launched G3Box with like-minded classmates. By repurposing shipping containers into health facilities on wheels, Palermo has helped secure health care for remote communities in desperate need of health care services.

 

KARINA PIKHART: 6 DOT

For the blind, selecting the right medication in a medicine cabinet can be a matter of life and death. To help, MIT engineering student Karina Pikhart created a device that can print out labels in braille, providing the visually impaired an easier way to identify important items.

6 dot braille machine

 

MARISSA GOLDSTEIN & SAVATHIA SRIDHARAN: ORORA GLOBAL

Creating an access to electricity in developing countries my seem like a pie-in-the-sky goal, but Orora Global, founded by two women attending Babson College, is making it happen with sustainable sources by providing lighting, cell phone charging and air cooling to impoverished communities. What’s more, the company is on track to earn over a quarter million dollars in revenue.

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